Friday, June 23, 2017

Anti-epilepsy drug restores normal brain activity in mild Alzheimer's disease

Anti-epilepsy drug restores normal brain activity in mild Alzheimer's disease:

Dementia Big
In the last decade, mounting evidence has linked seizure-like activity in the brain to some of the cognitive decline seen in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Patients with Alzheimer’s disease have an increased risk of epilepsy and nearly half may experience subclinical epileptic activity—disrupted electrical activity in the brain that doesn’t result in a seizure but which can be measured by electroencephalogram (EEG) or other brain scan technology.


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Anti-epilepsy drug restores normal brain activity in mild Alzheimer's disease

In the last decade, mounting evidence has linked seizure-like activity in the brain to some of the cognitive decline seen in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Patients with Alzheimer’s disease have an increased risk of epilepsy and nearly half may experience subclinical epileptic activity—disrupted electrical activity in the brain that doesn’t result in a seizure but which can be measured by electroencephalogram (EEG) or other brain scan technology.

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Leisure activities lower blood pressure in Alzheimer's caregivers

Going for a walk outside, reading, listening to music—these and other enjoyable activities can reduce blood pressure for elderly caregivers of spouses with Alzheimer’s disease, suggests a study in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society.

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New report examines evidence on interventions to prevent cognitive decline, dementia

Cognitive training, blood pressure management for people with hypertension, and increased physical activity all show modest but inconclusive evidence that they can help prevent cognitive decline and dementia, but there is insufficient evidence to support a public health campaign encouraging their adoption, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Additional research is needed to further understand and gain confidence in their effectiveness, said the committee that conducted the study and wrote the report.

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Leisure activities lower blood pressure in Alzheimer's caregivers

Leisure activities lower blood pressure in Alzheimer's caregivers:

Dementia Big
Going for a walk outside, reading, listening to music—these and other enjoyable activities can reduce blood pressure for elderly caregivers of spouses with Alzheimer’s disease, suggests a study in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society.


http://ift.tt/2sZb0E9

New report examines evidence on interventions to prevent cognitive decline, dementia

New report examines evidence on interventions to prevent cognitive decline, dementia:

Dementia Big
Cognitive training, blood pressure management for people with hypertension, and increased physical activity all show modest but inconclusive evidence that they can help prevent cognitive decline and dementia, but there is insufficient evidence to support a public health campaign encouraging their adoption, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Additional research is needed to further understand and gain confidence in their effectiveness, said the committee that conducted the study and wrote the report.


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Thursday, June 22, 2017

Cognitive decline may be prevented using interventions but may be inadequate says report

New research shows that there are several interventions that could help prevent cognitive decline. According to the latest report entitled “Preventing Cognitive Decline and Dementia: A Way Forward,” from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM), cognitive training, increase in physical activity, control of blood pressure adequately among those with a high blood pressure are all fruitful measures to reduce cognitive decline. However evidence to support these three interventions is encouraging but insufficient to justify a public health campaign focused on their adoption.

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